Big Fluffy Dogs

All dogs can be great, regardless of their breed, size, or appearance. Many folks seem to love big fluffy dogs since they can be so cuddly and adorable. We can’t blame anyone for that. After all, who doesn’t love a nice canine cuddle buddy?

Well, if you’re someone who is looking for big fluffy dogs to be a new member of your family, then you’ve come to the right place. We’ve done the research and gone through the details about many breeds of dogs. Here we are going to talk about some of our favorite big fluffy dogs!

Bernese Mountain Dog

Temperament: Affectionate, Good-Natured, Intelligent, Loyal, Calm, Sensitive, Alert

Life Expectancy: 7 to 10 years

Height: Male Bernese Mountain Dogs have an average height of 25 -27.5 inches, while Female Bernese Mountain Dogs are normally around 24 inches tall.

Weight: Male Bernese Mountain Dogs have an average weight of 80 to 115 pounds, while Female Bernese Mountain Dogs are usually 70 to 95 pounds.

More Info About The Bernese Mountain Dog

Coat

Bernese mountain dogs have thick, fairly long hair. Normally their color has a tricolor pattern. Black is usually the most dominant color around their entire body, followed by the two color markings of white and brown which can be easily noticed on their face, chest and on the in-betweens of their forearm and wrist. Of course, the dominant color can widely vary. 

Shedding Level

Bernese mountain dogs are quite high-shedding dogs. They shed heavily twice a year- one in the Spring and one in the Fall. They may require a reasonable amount of work to keep well-groomed. If you end up with a Bernese Mountain Dog, you may need to do some brushing and cleaning up when they shed their coat. Frequent brushing of their coat can help reduce the amount of hair they shed. Frequent brushing is also recommended for these dogs to help prevent tangles in their long fur.

Grooming

Grooming can be managed at home. Frequent brushing will help maintain their natural sheen—getting rid of dust and dirt from their coat. Their coat does not need to be trimmed or clipped often but they may require frequent bathing pretty often, especially if their days are mostly spent outdoors and they get dirty.

Drooling Level                                                 

Bernese mountain dogs have a tendency to drool, but they don’t get out of control. They can get a lot of drool on you, but they won’t leave a huge mess anywhere in your house. Their drooling level is manageable but you may end up wiping their mouth a bit to keep them tidy- especially if you’re eating in front of them!

Adaptability

Bernese mountain dogs are a very affectionate breed, and they really enjoy being around people and other dogs, too. Whether it’s their owners or other breeds, Bernese Mountain Dogs love company. They do not adapt well in apartment living or being left behind at home alone. They need a wide open space where they can freely play in. If these dogs don’t have enough company or exercise, they may develop behaviors such as frequent barking, digging and biting.

Trainability

Since Bernese mountain dogs are big fluffy dogs, the first two priorities in training should be obedience and socialization with people and other breeds. With their level of intelligence, training is usually pretty easy. In addition to that, they are very eager to be trained. They can be sensitive to a certain extent, particularly if their owner is too tough when disciplining them. This beautiful pup excels in training, like herding, tracking and agility.

Great Pyrenees

Temperament: Gentle, Strong-Willed, Fearless, Patient, Independent, Affectionate, Confident, Mellow

Life Expectancy: 10 to 12 years

Height: Male Great Pyrenees have an average height of 32 inches, while Female Great Pyrenees are usually around 28 inches tall.

Weight: Male Great Pyrenees have an average weight of 100 pounds and over, while Female Great Pyrenees usually weigh around 85 pounds.

More About The Great Pyrenees

Coat

Great Pyrenees have a double-coat in which the outer coat is fairly long, coarse and  can be either straight or wavy. Their undercoat is delicate and thick. Their color is plain white, but you may also encounter some Great Pyrenees that are white with patches of other colors on their body, which can be tan, gray and reddish-brown.

Shedding Level

With their fairly long outer coat and thick undercoat, their shedding level can be average to high. They shed twice a year, during the Spring and Fall. During their shedding seasons, you need to prepare yourself in cleaning up a lot of white hair. Nonetheless, they’re not a very high maintenance breed. They just need a half-hour of brushing a week to stay on top of things while they shed.

Grooming

As we’ve mentioned above, they only need to be brushed 30 minutes a week. Moreover, they don’t require regular bathing. You really only need to bathe your Great Pyrenees when they get dirty outside. After bathing, make sure to dry their coat completely before brushing their coat. Finally, also make sure that you check their hair for bugs and pests if you live in an area where ticks, etc. are common. 

Drooling Level

Their drooling level is tolerable. They have a tendency to drool but they aren’t tremendous droolers. But just like any other breed, they can drool a little bit more than usual when they’re about to eat or drink, or when they’re begging.

Adaptability

Due to their calm nature, the Great Pyrenees will actually do quite well living an apartment lifestyle or in a smaller house. However, they’re likely to develop bad behavior if they are often left on their own for long periods of time. They don’t need a whole lot of exercise, but they do need a bit of supervision. They make excellent watchdogs. You should start getting them exposed to people and other breeds while they’re still young, so that you can reinforce good behavior and socialize them. 

 

Trainability

Even though they’re not the most active breed, they should still get outside for at least a half hour a day. Moreover, it is worth mentioning that you might have a tough time training them as they’re the kind that thinks independently—it’s like they have a world of their own. They will express their boredom towards you while in the middle of training. But nonetheless, they make a great guardian and companion.

Leonberger

Temperament: Fearless, Obedient, Loyal, Adaptable, Loving, Friendly, Calm

Life Expectancy: Around 7 years

Height: Male Leonberger have an average height of 28 to 32 inches, while Female Leonberger are normally 25 to 30 inches tall.

Weight: Male Leonberger have an average weight of 110 to 170 pounds, while Female Leonberger are usually around 90 to 140 pounds.

More Info About The Leonberger

Coat

Leonberger’s coat may be straight or wavy, and they are double-coated. Their outer coat is full of thick long hair, while their undercoat tends to be shorter and fluffier. They can have various colors which can be red, reddish brown, sandy and yellow—and they often have black face markings as well.

Shedding Level

The Leonberger sheds twice a year, during the Spring and Fall seasons. They can shed quite a bit during these seasons. But putting these two seasons aside, all year-round they shed moderately. In addition, since they’re double-coated, expect that they can leave a bit of hair behind nearly anywhere they do. Quick daily brushing will definitely help to reduce the amount of hair they leave behind.

Grooming

Given the Leonberger’s size, it may take up a lot of time to groom them properly. They should have their coat brushed at least once a week in order to prevent matting. The hair behind their ears and backs of their legs are usually where the mats occur, so make sure these particular areas are groomed thoroughly.  Moreover, their nails should be trimmed every other week.

Drooling Level

The Leonberger won’t be a problem in the drool department. They can drool, but only when they’re just about to eat or when they’re very stressed. However, expect that they can leave a mess after drinking water, splashing and dripping water from their mouth.

Adaptability

Leonbergers do not adapt well to apartment living, as they love the outdoors. They love to run free in open spaces and play in the water, and their high energy level lets them play all day. These dogs do not do well being inside all day, they need their physical and mental stimulation.

Trainability

This big fluffy dog can be stronger than their owner, so they should have lots of training sessions- they need to keep in shape. Due to their high energy levels, they make great working dogs. With that in mind, they usually do quite well in training activities, such as agility training.

Newfoundland

Temperament: Sweet-Tempered, Gentle, Trainable, Intelligent

Life Expectancy: 9 to 10 years

Height: Male Newfoundland have an average height of about 28 inches, while Female Newfoundland are 26 inches.

Weight: Male Newfoundland have an average weight of 130 to 150 pounds, while Female Newfoundland are usually 100 to 120 pounds.

Some More Info About The Newfoundland

Coat

The Newfoundland comes in various different colors. Their fur is usually beige, black, black & tan, brown, gray, white & black, white & brown and white & gray—all of which may have some white color markings. The Newfoundland has a water-resistant double coat. Their outer coat has coarse and long, while their undercoat tends to be soft and dense.

Shedding Level

Newfoundland has a moderate level of shedding and the majority of their shedding takes place during the Spring and Fall seasons. You can expect that during those seasons, they’ll leave a large quantity of hair on the couch and on the ground. Nonetheless, since their shedding is only moderate year-round, it can be managed even on your own.

Grooming

Due to their size and heavy coat, Newfoundlands need a good brushing once a week and should be bathed every few weeks. A long-toothed comb or slicker brush is ought to do the trick, removing dead hair and preventing knotting. In addition, regular brushing of their coat will help reduce the amount of hair they can shed. You should also trim their nails to a shorter length.

Drooling Level

You may need a towel around to tend to Newfoundland’s high drooling level. They can leave a puddle of slippery slobber while leaving dripping strings on their mouth—particularly when they’re begging, about to eat or taking a drink. So, you should be wary of laying their head on you, especially when you’re about to hit the road as you may have to change clothes once it gets drenched in slobber.

Adaptability

Newfoundland is a member of the big fluffy dogs club. That being said, they won’t do well with apartment living—or even being in a house with limited space. They’ll be the happiest if they can get outside often and they can run around as much as they want. These dogs thrive in cooler climates, though they can adapt in warmer climates to some measure. If they’ll be living with frequent hot weather, make sure you have an air conditioner to avoid heat stroke.

Trainability

Newfoundland is an intelligent breed of dog is quick to learn—as well as being very devoted during training. A half an hour of exercise a day is enough to meet their needs, but Newfoundlands can have a lot of energy. They can also enjoy hiking and long walks. Moreover, if you like dog competitions, then the Newfoundland might be for you. This breed is usually more than willing to train for different exercises. There are several exercises and/or training this breed can excel with, which include cart pulling, agility training, herding, and more.

Collie

Temperament: Intelligent, Protective, Loyal, Friendly, Gentle, Active, Quiet, Affectionate

Life Expectancy: 12 to 14 years

Height: Male Collie have an average height of about 26 inches, while Female Collie are usually around 24 inches tall.

Weight: Male Collie have an average weight of 60 to 75 pounds, while Female Collie are about 50 to 65 pounds.

More Info About Collies

Coat

Collie has two coat types- they can have rough, long hair or smooth, short hair. Moreover, their coat comes in various different colors, which can be black white & tan, blue merle, blue merle & white, and a whole lot other combinations of colorings.

Shedding Level

Just like the other type of breeds here, the Collie’s shedding is seasonal. All throughout the year, they can shed from moderate to high amounts of coat. Most of their shedding occurs particularly in the Spring and Fall seasons. Longer hair Collies, obviously, will end up shedding more than the shorter hair variety.

Grooming

The smooth collie class is highly manageable since their coat won’t mat easily, but they still require regular bathing. The other variety, which is the rough collie, is prone to matting, most particularly behind-the-ear and elbow areas.  Brushing them at least once a week will help maintain a healthy coat and skin.

Drooling Level

You won’t have any problem with Collie in the drool department. Collies don’t drool quite as much as other breeds, especially other big fluffy dogs. You can expect them to drool a bit when you’re eating in front of them, but that’s about it.

Adaptability

Collies don’t really like being at home alone for long periods of time. When they’re left alone, Collies can develop bad barking habits. It might be surprising, but Collies adapt well to both cool and warm climates. They’re also the perfect companion for first-time dog owners.

Trainability

Due to their high level of intelligence, they’re relatively easier to train as compared to other breeds. They love training and learning new things from their owners. They will excel in obedience trials, agility training and herding. This is a very playful breed, and Collies love playing fetch and tag.

Tibetan Mastiff

Temperament: Stubborn, Aloof, Protective, Strong-Willed, Intelligent, Fearless, Loyal

Life Expectancy: 10 to 12 years

Height: Male Tibetan Mastiffs have an average height of 26+ inches, while Female Tibetan Mastiffs are usually at least 24 inches tall.

Weight: Male Tibetan Mastiffs have an average weight of 90 to 150+ pounds, while Female Tibetan Mastiffs are 70 to 120+ pounds.

More Info About The Tibetan Mastiff

Coat

Tibetan Mastiff is another breed that has a double coat. The outer coat is medium-length, thick and coarse-textured, while the undercoat is fluffy, heavy and delicate. Their coat has a wide variety of colors, which can be black, black & tan, brown, cream, red gold, blue gray, cream sable, and more—all of which may have some white markings.

Shedding Level

The Tibetan Mastiff sheds a moderate amount. But, unlike many other breeds, their shedding period only occurs once per year as they shed their Winter coat each Spring season. Regular brushing will get rid of dead hair and help reduce the amount of hair they end up shedding.

Grooming

Despite their size, Tibetan Mastiffs are pretty low-maintenance when it comes to grooming.  We recommend weekly brushing using a slicker brush to remove the dirt on the surface of their coat. In addition, use a wide-toothed comb, particularly on the head and tail to prevent mats. Moreover, since they are a double coated breed, they do require regular bathing. Though they can be bathed weekly in the least.

Drooling Level

Tibetan Mastiffs drool, but not excessively. However, as they get older, you will notice they’ll drool more than usual. It might take years, but it’s better to know now that a Tibetan Mastiff will end up drooling quite a bit later in life.

Adaptability

This breed prefers in cooler climates, where they are comfortable being active. They don’t adapt well to living an apartment lifestyle where they’ll be left often on their own. They can be very quiet, particularly if their physical and mental stimulation are met. But this isn’t the breed to be left outside at night, since they might get barky. They’re not recommended for novice owners since they like to think that they are the boss.

Trainability

Tibetan Mastiff is a very intelligent breed with lots of energy. However, they’re not your typical furry best friend, as they tend to hard-headed, particularly with obedience training. In their defense, it is likely their instinct they’re following over their owner’s command. Bribing them with treats can sometimes be effective. Nevertheless, if you are having trouble with training, this breed will almost already be ready and willing to play fetch and run around with you for exercise.

More Big Fluffy Dogs

We’ll be talking about more big fluffy dogs soon. Check our homepage and make sure you don’t miss our next installment! And if you have a certain breed you’d like us to write about, remember to feel free to let us know!

Kevin F.

Kevin F.

Hey guys! I'm Kevin and I'm the Founder of My Dog Reviews. I made this site to share my very own dog's reviews of food, treats, toys, and more. I also have become fascinated with dog breeds and I'm sharing my knowledge with the world. Have a breed, treat, or something you want me to write about? Just let me know!